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  • Posted August 20, 2017

Peaks & Valleys

Last week I was reminded of how quickly a high may be turned into a low – having been recharged from a retreat, and yet within a few days losing my patience for something I had thought my son had mastered. It was wrong of me to lose my patience, but I (like most of us) am only human and I have my faults. One I continue to work on is understanding just because my son may have seemingly “mastered” a skill, doesn’t mean it will translate naturally into a very similar skill – as it usually would for neurotypical peers.

When things happen to upset my equilibrium, I think back on the lessons Spencer Johnson covers in his book “Peaks and Valleys”. I first read the book the year my wife passed, when I couldn’t conceive of how I could be expected to do much more than just get out of bed and put clothes on. I’m not going to outline the entire book, but the premise is there will always be highs & lows; it’s up to you to note how you achieved your high and what brought the low – empowering you to increase the highs and decrease the lows.

I think I’m still processing those lessons – I certainly haven’t mastered them yet, even after (5) years. I believe we need to be ready to understand concepts, it’s not enough to tell ourselves we’re going to change – we have to internalize the reason we are making the change. I remember thinking I wanted to be happier after my wife passed, yet part of me felt guilty when I was in a good mood – I had to put that to rest.

This is one example, particular to me; but I think any of us who have something we say we want to accomplish, but are not truly doing what we need to be doing to accomplish it, can identify a demon we haven’t put to rest yet. This is, in my totally non-professional opinion, normal; it’s our valley(s).

We will start the climb to the peak when we acknowledge we have these thoughts. The climb will be longer for some than others, as we all make peace with ourselves in our own way. Some will work with therapists and caregivers, much like climbers hire guides to show them the most accessible (yet not necessarily any less difficult) paths to the top. Others will do their best to go alone, or work with someone who has been where they are and can show them how they got out. Some of us will have storms interrupting our progress, stopping us from as high as we could climb and forcing us to start over.

It’s not enough to say “don’t quit”. Not quitting doesn’t mean you’re going to be successful – Wile E Coyote never quit, look what that got him. If you are struggling, ask for help. At a minimum, find someone to open up to about what you’re struggling with. Speaking for myself, I often find new solutions I hadn’t considered when I verbalize my challenges. I’ve also received some incredible insight (although I’m slower than I like to admit to take action on recommendations).

At the end of the day remember this – every single person has something they are struggling with. What could be a significant challenge to them may seem minor to you, and vice versa; this is the beautiful thing about perspective. Rather than belittle them for their perception, help them find solutions. Find people that will do the same for you – they’re out there. Don’t let yourself get trapped in a valley, the view is much better at a peak!


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